Performance-art is a preferred model for malaria education among high school students in western Kenya

Published: 14-04-2021| Version 2 | DOI: 10.17632/2r7j9ms3xc.2
Contributors:
Mary Koki,
Patrick Okanya,

Description

The data set describes the results of a cross-sectional study designed to determine the level of malaria awareness and the preferred malaria education model(s) among high school students from selected schools in Western Kenya. The study was conducted in three schools and a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect relevant information. Students also participated in art and science malaria-based projects/activities. The study findings show majority of the students (90%) to possess correct knowledge of malaria symptoms and prevention interventions. Performance art was identified as the most preferred malaria education model (51%), followed by open group discussion (16%), science-based demonstration (13%), essay writing (12%) and creative drawing (8%). There was a significant association between sex and preferred model of malaria education with female participation rate in performance arts being significantly higher than that of males (χ=38, p<0.001). Overall, we show that performance art is the preferred model for malaria education among high school students in western Kenya. Identification of preferred engagement model may enable successful implementation of community-based malaria prevention and control activities.

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