FAQ

Top questions

Mendeley Data is an open research data repository, where researchers can upload and share their research data. Datasets can be shared privately amongst individuals, as well as published to share with the world. Sharing research data is important for science as it enables data reuse and supports reproducibility of studies. Sharing data is also a fantastic way for you as a researcher, to gain exposure for your research outputs, as every dataset has a DOI and can be cited.

There are many benefits when data is made publicly available. Other researchers can review the data, increasing transparency and confidence in your findings. Having access to data makes it more likely other scientists can reproduce and validate your research. Furthermore, they may be able to reuse the data in their own research, accelerating the pace of discovery, and citing and attributing you so you receive credit.

Our mission is to facilitate data sharing. We believe that when research data is made publicly available, science benefits:
- the findings can be verified and reproduced- the data can be reused in new ways
- discovery of relevant research is facilitated
- funders get more value from their funding investment.

Read more about our mission here: https://data.mendeley.com/mission

Yes, in June 2017 Mendeley Data was awarded the Data Seal of Approval, the industry standard certification for data repositories. This means Mendeley Data is recognised as a trustworthy repository to deposit research data. To receive the certification, repositories are evaluated against 18 guidelines, covering security, preservation, long-term availability and other factors. See the Data Seal of Approval website for more information

When you publish your data with our service, you choose a licence to publish it under, from a range of Creative Commons and open software and hardware licences.

Mendeley (and parent company Elsevier) don’t own the data which you upload to and publish using the Mendeley Data service - you retain complete control and copyright over the data, and choose the terms under which others may consume and reuse it.

You may delete your draft datasets within the web interface or API; you may delete your published datasets, by contacting us.

The terms which you accept by creating a Mendeley user account and posting data, grant our service permission to 'publish, extract, reformat, adapt, build upon, index, re-distribute, link to and otherwise use [published data]'. We (at least currently and as far as we can foresee) only seek to carry out these activities to the extent needed to provide services on our website and in our API for end users, such as enabling discovering and accessing public datasets.

Your data is stored on Amazon S3 (a storage and hosting service) servers in Ireland, which assures the integrity and security of data S3 achieves 99.999999999% durability of data objects over a given year. Our service has been extensively penetration tested and received certification.

In addition, your published datasets are archived with Data Archiving and Network Services(DANS), to preserve your data over the long term.

DANS is a long-term archiving provider, which is an institute of the Dutch Academy KNAW, and NWO, the Netherlands' national research council. We have a contract with DANS to archive all valid, published datasets in perpetuity. The agreement ensures that the DOIs we provide for datasets will always resolve to a web page, where the dataset metadata and files will be available.

Data archived at DANS is backed up and stored in three locations for redundancy.

About Mendeley Data

Mendeley Data is an open research data repository, where researchers can upload and share their research data. Datasets can be shared privately amongst individuals, as well as published to share with the world. Sharing research data is important for science as it enables data reuse and supports reproducibility of studies. Sharing data is also a fantastic way for you as a researcher, to gain exposure for your research outputs, as every dataset has a DOI and can be cited.

There are many benefits when data is made publicly available. Other researchers can review the data, increasing transparency and confidence in your findings. Having access to data makes it more likely other scientists can reproduce and validate your research. Furthermore, they may be able to reuse the data in their own research, accelerating the pace of discovery, and citing and attributing you so you receive credit.

Our mission is to facilitate data sharing. We believe that when research data is made publicly available, science benefits:
- the findings can be verified and reproduced- the data can be reused in new ways
- discovery of relevant research is facilitated
- funders get more value from their funding investment.

Read more about our mission here: https://data.mendeley.com/mission

Yes, in June 2017 Mendeley Data was awarded the Data Seal of Approval, the industry standard certification for data repositories. This means Mendeley Data is recognised as a trustworthy repository to deposit research data. To receive the certification, repositories are evaluated against 18 guidelines, covering security, preservation, long-term availability and other factors. See the Data Seal of Approval website for more information

When you publish your data with our service, you choose a licence to publish it under, from a range of Creative Commons and open software and hardware licences.

Mendeley (and parent company Elsevier) don’t own the data which you upload to and publish using the Mendeley Data service - you retain complete control and copyright over the data, and choose the terms under which others may consume and reuse it.

You may delete your draft datasets within the web interface or API; you may delete your published datasets, by contacting us.

The terms which you accept by creating a Mendeley user account and posting data, grant our service permission to 'publish, extract, reformat, adapt, build upon, index, re-distribute, link to and otherwise use [published data]'. We (at least currently and as far as we can foresee) only seek to carry out these activities to the extent needed to provide services on our website and in our API for end users, such as enabling discovering and accessing public datasets.

Your data is stored on Amazon S3 (a storage and hosting service) servers in Ireland, which assures the integrity and security of data S3 achieves 99.999999999% durability of data objects over a given year. Our service has been extensively penetration tested and received certification.

In addition, your published datasets are archived with Data Archiving and Network Services(DANS), to preserve your data over the long term.

DANS is a long-term archiving provider, which is an institute of the Dutch Academy KNAW, and NWO, the Netherlands' national research council. We have a contract with DANS to archive all valid, published datasets in perpetuity. The agreement ensures that the DOIs we provide for datasets will always resolve to a web page, where the dataset metadata and files will be available.

Data archived at DANS is backed up and stored in three locations for redundancy.

A dataset is the term for a collection of research data files produced in the course of research for a paper or project, plus accompanying metadata: describing the data, and indicating who produced the data, and who may access it - i.e. title, description, categories, contributors, licence and so forth.

Yes, datasets posted to Mendeley Data are currently moderated: each dataset is checked by a qualified reviewer, to ensure the content constitutes research data, is scientific in nature, and doesn’t solely contain a previously published research article. We don’t currently validate or curate the contents of valid research datasets.

Datasets which meet the requirements (See What are the requirements for datasets?) will become publicly visible on the dataset index, and will be archived with Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS). Datasets that don't meet the requirements will not become publicly visible.

If you spot a dataset that you think doesn’t meet our requirements, please flag it up to us by clicking the “report” button on the dataset.

No, your dataset will go into moderation to check it meets the requirements (See What are the requirements for datasets?).

After your dataset has been reviewed, you will receive an email to tell you whether it has been accepted and is publically visible with an active DOI, or it has been flagged for not complying with the requirements for Mendeley Data datasets.

For technical support using Mendeley Data, please contact our product development team at data@mendeley.com

You can “Browse Datasets” by visiting https://data.mendeley.com/datasets, where you can see the complete index of published datasets.

In addition, on this page you can search for datasets by keyword, within dataset metadata and data files. The search functionality is powered by the Elsevier Data Search engine (https://datasearch.elsevier.com)

Datasets must be given a title, description and at least one named contributor. You can upload files of any format, up to a maximum of 10GB per dataset.

Datasets must be:

- scientific in nature
- research data - i.e. raw or processed experimental or observational data, rather than the narrative research article, which may have resulted from the research

Datasets must not:

- have already been published, and therefore already possessing a DOI
- contain executable files or archives that are not accompanied by individually detailed file descriptions.
- contain copyrighted content (audio, video, image, etc) to which you do not own the copyright
- contain sensitive information (for example, but not limited to: patient details, dates of birth etc.)

If you spot a dataset that you think doesn’t meet our requirements, you can flag it by clicking the “report” button on the dataset.

Mendeley Data is a service provided by Mendeley Limited. Mendeley Limited is registered in England and Wales under company number 6419015. Its VAT number is 930 1117 75.

All services provided by Mendeley Data - storing, posting and accessing data - are free-to-use. In future, we may introduce additional paid-for repository services for individual users - for instance charging for storing and posting data, above a certain dataset size threshold. This will not affect existing datasets, which will continue to be stored for free. In future, we plan to offer paid-for versions of our repository service to academic institutions.

As an institution, you can benefit from advanced institutional repository features such as: a showcase for your institution’s research data outputs, advanced analytics and reporting, integration with Pure and other CRIS systems, institutional authentication system integration (enabling your researchers to log in via CAS systems for instance); support for publishing restricted data, plus competitive storage offerings. We can also provide highly effective email campaign management tools which encourage researcher engagement with research data sharing.

In addition, we’re developing exciting new tools aimed at helping researchers in research groups manage their data and collaborate better. Researchers will be able to capture research data automatically from source (instruments, Electronic Lab Notebooks, etc), well annotated with domain-specific metadata (automated as far as possible), and share data with their group effortlessly, to receive and exchange feedback, and collaboratively prepare their data to publish.

If the above features are of interest, or to discuss your institution’s research data needs holistically, please get in touch at data@mendeley.com, or contact our business development director Alberto at a.zigoni at elsevier.com

Yes, Mendeley Data provides an open RESTful API which allows creating and editing your datasets, as well as retrieving and accessed published datasets. The API endpoints are fully documented here, including information on how to authenticate and access the API. We’re delighted to hear how you’re using our API! Please get in touch at data@mendeley.com

Further information on the API is available here: http://dev.mendeley.com/overview/datasets_resources.html

Yes! Once you have published your data it is given a digital object identifier (DOI) number, making it a citable reference.

A digital object identifier (DOI) is an alphanumeric code providing a unique and persistent link to specific electronically published content.

Mendeley Data assigns a provisional DOI to draft datasets. The issuing of a permanent DOI for Mendeley Data submitted datasets is carried out by the British Library via DataCite. It is used to make a document/reference uniquely identifiable from any other document/reference when your article is published and made available electronically. The DOI for a document remains fixed over the lifetime of the document.

Steps:

1. Register/log in to Mendeley Data.
2. Click “New dataset”.
3.Upload data files.
4. Add metadata (including Title, Description and Contributors) for the dataset.
5. Save (don’t publish yet unless you’re ready for it to go public).
6. Hit Publish

No - when you create/log in to an account on Mendeley Data, you are creating/logging in with Mendeley.

My Research

A dataset is the term for a collection of research data files produced in the course of research for a paper or project, plus accompanying metadata: describing the data, and indicating who produced the data, and who may access it - i.e. title, description, categories, contributors, licence and so forth.

Yes, datasets posted to Mendeley Data are currently moderated: each dataset is checked by a qualified reviewer, to ensure the content constitutes research data, is scientific in nature, and doesn’t solely contain a previously published research article. We don’t currently validate or curate the contents of valid research datasets.

Datasets which meet the requirements (See What are the requirements for datasets?) will become publicly visible on the dataset index, and will be archived with Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS). Datasets that don't meet the requirements will not become publicly visible.

If you spot a dataset that you think doesn’t meet our requirements, please flag it up to us by clicking the “report” button on the dataset.

No, your dataset will go into moderation to check it meets the requirements (See What are the requirements for datasets?).

After your dataset has been reviewed, you will receive an email to tell you whether it has been accepted and is publically visible with an active DOI, or it has been flagged for not complying with the requirements for Mendeley Data datasets.

When you begin putting together a dataset, a draft version 1 is created, visible only to yourself and anybody you invite as a collaborator or share the link with. When you publish this dataset, it becomes a public version 1.

If you start to edit the dataset again, for instance to change any of the metadata, or to add or remove files, you will be editing version 2.

All published versions of a dataset can be viewed and compared by clicking the links in the Version history.

Any file type can be uploaded to Mendeley Data. We have support the ability to preview a range of file types within the browser (e.g. PDF, text, JPG, PNG, CSV, Excel etc.) and will continue to add more. If there are file types it would be particularly useful for you to visualise, please get in touch at data@mendeley.com

Yes, your published dataset metadata is aggregated to DataCite’s metadata index (a comprehensive research datasets metadata index) and to the OpenAIRE portal, the EU’s research portal which aims to make as much European-funded research output as possible available to all.

If the data you publish is associated to an article, we can create a link from the dataset to the article page, enabling researchers to easily access the associated research. See an example here: https://data.mendeley.com/datasets/v8sfxkh9pw/1

One of our reviewers will contact you after your dataset has passed moderation, and ask whether you would like to link your published article and your dataset.

If you have an existing dataset and article you’d like to link, you can contact us anytime at data@mendeley.com, and we’ll take care of the linking process.

If you are able to provide your published article’s DOI, then we hope to link these within 1-2 working days.

All new datasets start off in a draft mode. While a dataset is in draft mode, the only people able to see the dataset are yourself, any contributors you add and other people you choose to share the dataset with (See How can I share my dataset?). As soon as you publish the dataset it is visible to everyone.

As the dataset creator, you are the sole dataset ‘owner’. This means only you can edit your draft dataset. You may share a private link allowing others to view the draft dataset, but they won’t be able to edit it.

You can delete a dataset until the point that you publish it. After this, you will need to contact us at data@mendeley.com to request that the dataset is deleted.

This is because a document that has been issued a DOI should be permanently accessible via the DOI. However, we understand that sometimes documents need to be deleted (e.g. in cases where there are legal implications of a dataset being published).

If the dataset is deleted after publishing, the DOI will still resolve to a web page, which indicates the reason the version of the dataset has been hidden and the dataset is not available to view. The title and other metadata will also not appear.

Yes! Once you have published your data it is given a digital object identifier (DOI) number, making it a citable reference.

A digital object identifier (DOI) is an alphanumeric code providing a unique and persistent link to specific electronically published content.

Mendeley Data assigns a provisional DOI to draft datasets. The issuing of a permanent DOI for Mendeley Data submitted datasets is carried out by the British Library via DataCite. It is used to make a document/reference uniquely identifiable from any other document/reference when your article is published and made available electronically. The DOI for a document remains fixed over the lifetime of the document.

Yes you can. When your dataset is published, it is given a version number. If you go back to edit this dataset, it will be given a new version number when it is published (changing only the last digits of the DOI number).

When you publish your data, you’re making it openly available, therefore others may access and reuse your data. However they must conform to the licence you chose when you published the data - so if you chose a licence which requires attribution, they must give you credit and effectively cite your dataset. Your draft dataset on the other hand, cannot be accessed by others, except if you gave access via the share link.

Steps:

1. Register/log in to Mendeley Data.
2. Click “New dataset”.
3.Upload data files.
4. Add metadata (including Title, Description and Contributors) for the dataset.
5. Save (don’t publish yet unless you’re ready for it to go public).
6. Hit Publish

Each draft dataset has a share link which you can copy to send to collaborators; they’ll be able to access the dataset metadata and files prior to publishing.

Follow the My Datasets link at the top of the page.

When publishing a dataset, a user may choose to defer the date at which the data becomes available (for example, so that it is available at the same time as an associated article).

This means that the description and files of that dataset are not publicly available until the embargo date is reached.

Meanwhile, some other information about the dataset - such as the contributors, title, citation and associated articles become available immediately, prior to the embargo.

My Account

When you publish your data with our service, you choose a licence to publish it under, from a range of Creative Commons and open software and hardware licences.

Mendeley (and parent company Elsevier) don’t own the data which you upload to and publish using the Mendeley Data service - you retain complete control and copyright over the data, and choose the terms under which others may consume and reuse it.

You may delete your draft datasets within the web interface or API; you may delete your published datasets, by contacting us.

The terms which you accept by creating a Mendeley user account and posting data, grant our service permission to 'publish, extract, reformat, adapt, build upon, index, re-distribute, link to and otherwise use [published data]'. We (at least currently and as far as we can foresee) only seek to carry out these activities to the extent needed to provide services on our website and in our API for end users, such as enabling discovering and accessing public datasets.

Your data is stored on Amazon S3 (a storage and hosting service) servers in Ireland, which assures the integrity and security of data S3 achieves 99.999999999% durability of data objects over a given year. Our service has been extensively penetration tested and received certification.

In addition, your published datasets are archived with Data Archiving and Network Services(DANS), to preserve your data over the long term.

DANS is a long-term archiving provider, which is an institute of the Dutch Academy KNAW, and NWO, the Netherlands' national research council. We have a contract with DANS to archive all valid, published datasets in perpetuity. The agreement ensures that the DOIs we provide for datasets will always resolve to a web page, where the dataset metadata and files will be available.

Data archived at DANS is backed up and stored in three locations for redundancy.

For technical support using Mendeley Data, please contact our product development team at data@mendeley.com

No - when you create/log in to an account on Mendeley Data, you are creating/logging in with Mendeley.

Follow the My Datasets link at the top of the page.

Other

For technical support using Mendeley Data, please contact our product development team at data@mendeley.com

You can “Browse Datasets” by visiting https://data.mendeley.com/datasets, where you can see the complete index of published datasets.

In addition, on this page you can search for datasets by keyword, within dataset metadata and data files. The search functionality is powered by the Elsevier Data Search engine (https://datasearch.elsevier.com)

Yes, your published dataset metadata is aggregated to DataCite’s metadata index (a comprehensive research datasets metadata index) and to the OpenAIRE portal, the EU’s research portal which aims to make as much European-funded research output as possible available to all.

Yes, Mendeley Data provides an open RESTful API which allows creating and editing your datasets, as well as retrieving and accessed published datasets. The API endpoints are fully documented here, including information on how to authenticate and access the API. We’re delighted to hear how you’re using our API! Please get in touch at data@mendeley.com

Further information on the API is available here: http://dev.mendeley.com/overview/datasets_resources.html

A digital object identifier (DOI) is an alphanumeric code providing a unique and persistent link to specific electronically published content.

Mendeley Data assigns a provisional DOI to draft datasets. The issuing of a permanent DOI for Mendeley Data submitted datasets is carried out by the British Library via DataCite. It is used to make a document/reference uniquely identifiable from any other document/reference when your article is published and made available electronically. The DOI for a document remains fixed over the lifetime of the document.

Mendeley Data provides a platform to showcase your authors’ and journals’ datasets, making them discoverable alongside datasets from over 200 journals.

Enable authors effortlessly to submit their research data, linked to their article paper, via custom integration with your submission system; the draft dataset will be available to reviewers, and once the article has been reviewed, accepted and published, the article and data pages will link to each other - or opt for an embedded view of the dataset on the article page.

Research data in a wide range of formats can be visualised inline in the dataset web page (and article page, if you opt for the embedded dataset capability), thanks to our file viewer capability, enabling readers easily to preview and evaluate the data before downloading.

Additionally, we provide a branded, searchable portal page for your journal and for your publishing presence.

Get in touch at data@mendeley.com to discuss how we can increase the visibility and exposure of your data outputs, all while keeping the process simple for your journals and authors.

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