Data Set for Effect of Soil Nutrient Sources on Pepper

Published: 1 February 2021| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/45xzvj8c35.1
Contributors:
Valentine Chidera,
Eugene Ojua,
Ngozi Abu

Description

Capsicum annuum fruits are rich in most micronutrients needed in meeting up with the daily allowances paramount in maintaining a healthy living. The genes responsible for the expression of all these traits are inherent in the DNA of Capsicum annuum varieties or cultivars. For optimal expression of these genes, the perfect environment, agronomy and other related factors must be maintained. Liaven et al., (2008) found that amounts and characteristics of pepper fruits from plants cultivated in soil supplemented with manure were generally better than those from plants grown in soil only. Manure application has been one of the agronomic practices adopted by farmers to ensure optimal production. Better taste, greater satisfaction and higher quality standards, represents consumers motive for the acquisition of pepper fruits (Heaton, 2001). Knowledge of the potential impacts of different manure sources on pepper morphology, yield and fruits quality will be paramount. It will go a long way in suggesting to agriculturists, breeders and potential consumers of pepper products, the perfect condition for the expression of these genes which are highly influenced by the environment. Production of pepper fruits of high nutritional value will contribute immensely in meeting up with the daily allowances of micronutrients as pepper fruits are consumed severally in diets on daily basis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the agro-morphological and biochemical composition of four cultivars of Capsicum annuum fruits (Shombo, Tatase, Ataragu and Nsukka yellow pepper) grown with different nutrient sources. Poultry mixture: This was done in the same ratio as the nursery medium, prepared with top soil, poultry droppings and run-off soil mixed in the ratio 3:2:1, respectively and allowed to cure for a period of seven (7) days. Pig mixture: This was prepared with top soil, pig droppings and run-off soil mixed in the ratio 3:2:1 respectively and left to cure for seven (7) days. Goat mixture: This was also prepared with top soil, goat droppings and run-off soil mixed in the ratio 3:2:1 respectively and allowed to cure for a period of seven (7) days NPK application: 30 grams of NPK 20:10:10 was applied two weeks after transplanting using the ring method of application (Olatunji and Agele, 2015). Preparation of control: Top soil and run-off soil mixed in the ratio 3:1 formed the control.

Files