Association of marital status with stage and survival in patients with mycosis fungoides: a population-based study

Published: 18-03-2021| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/59559prpmv.1
Contributors:
LingXiao Xing,
Xiaolu Tang,
Jing Zhang,
Lu He,
Hui Shen,
Jiazhu Wu,

Description

This research was designed to investigate the association of marital status with stage and survival of patients with MF. A total of 3375 eligible cases diagnosed from 2004 to 2015 were included from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Association of marital status with stage and survival in patients with MF was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate analysis. Married patients were more likely to be diagnosed at T1 stage (P=0.041). More favorable overall survival (P<0.001) and cancer-specific survival (P<0.001) were demonstrated in married patients as compared with divorced patients or widowed patients. A clinically feasible prognostic model including marital status, age, sex, race, and stage at presentation were constructed. We came to the conclusion that married marital status was associated with earlier stage at diagnosis and longer survival compared with divorced or widowed marital status. Mendeley supplementsl figure 1 showed that the impacts of marital status on the cancer-specific survival (CSS) in the 2522 patients with CSS data. Mendeley supplementsl figure 2 showed that male patients, black patients, patients older than 60 years or those diagnosed at advanced T stage showed remarkably inferior OS and CSS. According to the results of multivariate analysis showed in Mendeley supplemental table I, we developed a prognostic model of MF consisted of 5 independent predictors of OS including marital status, age, sex, race, and T stage at diagnosis. Patients were divided into 4 risk groups based on the summed final risk scores (low risk group: 0-2; intermediate risk group:3-5; high risk group:6-7, very-high risk group: 8-10).Patients for the four risk groups had remarkably different OS(P<0.001)and CSS (P<0.001) (Mendeley supplemental figure 3).

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