Data for: Efficient informal trade: Theory and experimental evidence from the Cape Town taxi market

Published: 9 Dec 2016 | Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/7g6wdr8zp8.1
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Description of this data

Abstract of associated article: Informal sectors in developing countries are often thought of as responses to rigid and cumbersome market regulations. In this paper I study informal trade as a first-best outcome. In the model I propose rigid regulations can be necessary to achieve efficiency even though they are always sidestepped. The key assumption is that the regulations define the trading parties' fall-back position in case the informal bargaining process breaks down. I set up a field experiment to test the model's mechanisms in the Cape Town market for metered taxis. Consistent with the model, I find that sidestepping the regulations increase cost efficiency (taxis take the shortest route). The price is however unaffected, suggesting informal bargaining leads to a Pareto improvement.

Experiment data files

This data is associated with the following publication:

Efficient informal trade: Theory and experimental evidence from the Cape Town taxi market

Published in: Journal of Development Economics

Latest version

  • Version 1

    2016-12-09

    Published: 2016-12-09

    DOI: 10.17632/7g6wdr8zp8.1

    Cite this dataset

    Bengtsson, Niklas (2016), “Data for: Efficient informal trade: Theory and experimental evidence from the Cape Town taxi market ”, Mendeley Data, v1 http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/7g6wdr8zp8.1

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Economics, Macroeconomics

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