Personality traits and Conflict resolution styles: A meta-analysis dataset

Published: 09-10-2019| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/8ttnxy2z5m.1
Contributors:
Hossein Dabiriyan Tehrani,
sara yamini

Description

This meta-analysis aimed to address the association between personality traits and conflict handling styles. ProQuest, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science and also Microsoft Academic, Science.gov, Science open were searched for all published and non-published studies through 17 October 2018. A literature search located 20 eligible studies, and 5337 total participants. The primary hypotheses of this meta-analysis were framed based on the literature as follows: Hypothesis 1: Neuroticism, agreeableness, and extroversion will be positively related to avoiding style and openness to experience, and conscientiousness will be negatively related to avoiding style. Hypothesis 2: Neuroticism, agreeableness, extroversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness will be positively related to compromising style. Hypothesis 3: Neuroticism, extroversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness will be positively related to dominating style and agreeableness will be negatively related to dominating style. Hypothesis 4: Neuroticism, agreeableness, extroversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness will be positively related to obliging style. Hypothesis 5: Agreeableness, extroversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness will be positively related to integrating style and neuroticism will be negatively related to integrating style. The secondary hypothesis of this meta-analysis seeks to explain the variation of above mentioned hypothesis according to study setting and personality measures. The results of this review show that neuroticism and agreeableness are positively related to avoiding style. The positive associations are observed between agreeableness, extroversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness with compromising style. There exist positive and negative relations between extroversion and agreeableness with dominating style, respectively. A positive link is identified between agreeableness and obliging style. Finally, agreeableness, extroversion, openness to experience, and conscientiousness are positively correlated with integrating style and neuroticism is negatively related to integrating style. The findings of moderator analysis indicate that there is a different pattern between work and academic settings concerning the relationship between agreeableness with compromising. Similarly, the results of the academic setting yielded the different populations as the work setting when it comes to the link between neuroticism and compromising style. To identify the robustness of findings and probable small study effect, we employed the trim and fill method (Duval & Tweedie, 2000) , file drawer analysis (Rosenthal, 1979) , Begg's rank test (Begg & Mazumdar, 1994) and Egger's linear regression test (Egger, Smith, Schneider, & Minder, 1997). the results of publication bias show that small-study effects are negligible.

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