Effect of inclusion of pigeon pea leaves in the concentrate mixture on gas production parameters

Published: 19 August 2022| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/cjjdpmtpch.1
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Description

In vitro gas production technique was employed to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of pigeon pea leaves (PPL) in the CM on gas production kinetics, methane gas emission, ammonia nitrogen production, predicted Metabolizable energy (ME), organic matter digestibility (OMD), microbial protein production (MPP) and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. The experiment was conducted using a completely randomized design with five replications. The treatments were native pasture hay (NPH) and concentrate mixture (CM) at the ratio of 50:50 (T1) or inclusion of 10% PPL in the CM (T2) or inclusion of 20% PPL in the CM (T3) or inclusion of 30% PPL in the CM (T4). The total gas production was greater (P < 0.05) for T1, T2, and T3 than for T4, and total gas production was similar among T1, T2, and T3. The greater (P < 0.05) gas production from immediately soluble fraction was observed for T3 than T4, and T1 and T2 had an intermediate value (P > 0.05). The potential gas production was greater (P < 0.05) for T2 than for T4, while T1 and T3 had an intermediate value. Treatment 1 and T2 had greater (P < 0.05) ME values than Treatment 4, and Treatment 3 had an intermediate value. Organic matter digestibility and microbial N production were increased (P < 0.0001) as the level of inclusion of PPL increased in the CM. It can be concluded that the inclusion of 20% of PPL in the CM was optimum, however, to provide reliable information and to draw a conclusion animal evaluation is required.

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Effect of inclusion of pigeon pea leaves to the concentrate mixture on on gas production kinetics, methane gas emission, ammonia nitrogen production, predicted Metabolizable energy (ME), organic matter digestibility (OMD), microbial protein production (MPP) and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. The experiment was conducted using a completely randomized design with five replications. The treatments were native pasture hay (NPH) and concentrate mixture (CM) at the ratio of 50:50 (T1) or inclusion of 10% PPL in the CM (T2) or inclusion of 20% PPL in the CM (T3) or inclusion of 30% PPL in the CM (T4). The total gas production was greater (P < 0.05) for T1, T2, and T3 than for T4, and total gas production was similar among T1, T2, and T3. The greater (P < 0.05) gas production from immediately soluble fraction was observed for T3 than T4, and T1 and T2 had an intermediate value (P > 0.05). The potential gas production was greater (P < 0.05) for T2 than for T4, while T1 and T3 had an intermediate value. Treatment 1 and T2 had greater (P < 0.05) ME values than Treatment 4, and Treatment 3 had an intermediate value. Organic matter digestibility and microbial N production were increased (P < 0.0001) as the level of inclusion of PPL increased in the CM. It can be concluded that the inclusion of 20% of PPL in the CM was optimum, however, to provide reliable information and to draw a conclusion animal evaluation is required.

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Hawassa University

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Animal Nutrition

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