Consonantal Gemination in Old English

Published: 29 November 2022| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/dzz37fgwwd.1
Contributor:
Hideo Kobayashi

Description

This dataset contains 255 word-final geminates and 754 word-medial geminates in Old English words. The research hypothesis which I will be testing is whether or not Kim (1973)'s claim is based on the real words with geminates in Old English. Kim (1973) shows that consonants such as /ll/, /rr/, /mm/, /nn/, and /ss/ are likely to form geminates in OE whereas /pp/, /tt/, and /kk/ are less likely to form geminates. /þþ/ is a doubtful geminate (Kim 1973). The Old English words have been collected manually from past studies - Wright and Wright (1923; 1925), Kim (1973), Campbell (1977), Quirk and Wrenn (1994), Baker (2005), and Hogg (2011). As the second page in the document file shows, the distribution of word-final and word-medial geminates is tabulated. This approach could help illustrate which consonants are more likely to form a geminate and which consonants are not likely to do so in the source language.

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Steps to reproduce

It is possible to reproduce the dataset by gathering Old English words with consonantal geminates from Wright and Wright (1923; 1925), Kim (1973), Campbell (1977), Quirk and Wrenn (1994), Baker (2005), and Hogg (2011).

Categories

English Language, Formal Linguistics, History of Linguistics

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