Effects of a pilot educational intervention on perceptions of visible skin diseases in the pediatric population

Published: 23-10-2020| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/fw9ry6jbn3.1
Contributors:
Sneha Rangu,
Katie Danielson,
Sarah Kavanagh,
Lisa Catanoso ,
Leanne Magee,
Leslie Castelo-Soccio

Description

This research study evaluate the effects of an educational intervention on perceptions of visible skin diseases in children. The intervention included reading a story about a fictional child with alopecia areata (see "Henry Wears a Hat Book PDF") and facilitating discussion with children in the context of diversity, equity, and inclusion criteria. Children were asked to choose a doll, neither dolls, or both dolls based on study tester's request before and after the intervention. Dolls included a doll with disease (alopecia areata, vitiligo, epidermolysis bullosa, and port wine stain) and the same doll without disease (see "Photo of Dolls"). We found that the intervention had a positive effect for all requests, but varied by disease. For alopecia areata, there was a positive effect for all 5 requests.

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