Data for: Scale dependence shapes how plant traits differentially affect levels of pre- and post-dispersal seed predation in Scots pine

Published: 23-04-2019| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/g4djzdh4v8.1
Contributors:
Fiona Worthy,
Philip Hulme

Description

This set of data files comprises 8 Excel files. Each file contains 2 worksheets. The first is the data that was used for analysis in the manuscript; 'Scale dependence shapes how plant traits differentially affect levels of pre- and post-dispersal seed predation in Scots pine'. The second worksheet gives a key to the meaning of the title for each column in the dataset, and a brief explanation of how the data was obtained. Full details are given in the manuscript. The file 'GPS tree positions' gives the locations of each point in the study sites. These locations are not used in the data analysis. The file 'Ages of cohorts of cones' explains how the age of cones (cone-age) was quantified relative to the point in time that they were first accessible to seed predators. This term is used within all data sets and throughout the manuscript. The file 'Tree, cone, seed and vegetation characteristics' contains a data set regarding an array of characteristics regarding the study trees, their cones and seeds, that would be expected to influence the foraging of seed predators. It also includes measures of the height of the understory vegetation, because this is expected to influence the foraging of post-dispersal seed predators. This data set gave such a large number of potential explanatory variables, that it was made the subject of Common factor analysis; producing four 'cone-factors' and nine 'veg-factors' that were used for subsequent analysis of seed predation (see Appendix to the manuscript). The file ‘Monthly seedfall, cone and seed traits’ contains a dataset that records seed fall and features of cones and trees that varied over time, including seed content and phenolic content of seeds. Each stage at which seeds were vulnerable to seed predators was addressed using different observational / experimental techniques. Therefore, the data has been presented and analysed in four separate files. 'Pre-dispersal seed fate' records the proportion of cones fallen into sectors marked out beneath the sampled trees, that had either been foraged upon by red squirrels, crossbills, or fallen naturally. 'Dispersed cone fate' records the number of marked and experimentally fixed cones that were removed (presumed to be by red squirrels) within a month of being deployed on the forest floor. 'Open cone seed fate' records the proportion of seeds that were removed by birds from open cones, tied back onto the tree after having all seeds extracted and then having a known number fixed back inside. 'Post-dispersal seed fate' records the number of seeds removed by post-dispersal seed predators from 'seed dishes' that were deployed on the forest floor. These dishes each contained seeds that were exposed in a combination of conditions that allowed access to different guilds of seed predators.

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