employees' remedial voice

Published: 18 June 2020| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/h95cggxmkb.1
Contributor:
Xiaotao Zheng

Description

This dataset includes 620 full-time Chinese workers and 17 variables. 1. “Mistreatment or not” was coded as follows: experienced mistreatment=1, never experienced mistreatment=0. 2. “Mistreatment source” was coded as follows: supervisor mistreatment = 0, policy-related mistreatment = 1. 3. “Mistreatment severity” was assessed using a 7-point Likert-type one-item scale, with anchors ranging from 1 (extremely low) to 7 (extremely high). 4. “Response to mistreatment” had 5 options: a. do nothing; b. use formal voice directly after perceiving mistreatment; c. voice discontent to the blamed parties (supervisor or organization’s administration) directly and reach agreement; d. voice discontent to the blamed parties (supervisor or organization’s administration) but not reach agreement, and ultimately accept this result; e. voice discontent to the blamed parties (supervisor or organization’s administration) but not reach agreement, and ultimately use formal voice. 5. “Informal voice works or not” means that if employees use informal voice, whether they can resolve dispute or not. This variable is inferred from “response to mistreatment”. When employees chose the last two options (i.e. “d” and “e”), it means inform voice doesn’t work and coded as 1. 6. “Silence or voice” means if employees experienced mistreatment, whether they use voice or remain silent. This variable is inferred from “response to mistreatment”. Remain silent was coded as 0 and use voice as 1. 7. “Informal or formal voice” means if employees choose voice, whether they use informal or formal voice. This variable is inferred from “response to mistreatment”. Informal voice was coded as 0 and formal voice as 1. 8. “Silence or formal voice” means if informal voice doesn’t work, whether they use formal voice or remain silent. This variable is inferred from “response to mistreatment”. Remain silent was coded as 0 and use formal voice as 1. 9. “External job opportunities” were assessed with a three-item scale. On this 7-point Likert-type scale, anchors ranged from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree). The variable is the mean of the three items. 10. Demographic information. Gender, organizational ownership, and industry were coded as dummy variables—specifically, male = 0 and female = 1; state-owned unit = 0 and private units= 1; and manufacturing industry = 0 and service industry = 1. Age is divided into four categories: <25 years old; ≥25 and <30; ≥30 and <40; ≥40. Organizational tenure is divided into five categories: <1 year; ≥1 and <3; ≥3 and <5; <5 and <10; ≥10.

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Employee Voice

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