Gossip, Sabotage, and Friendship Network Dataset

Published: 10-02-2021| Version 2 | DOI: 10.17632/kpjjvg39k3.2
Contributors:
Gustav R. Sjobeck,
Rebecca Glass,

Description

Data were collected from a Men’s and Women’s collegiate crew team members from a small liberal arts college. Participants (N = 44) reported information about how often they gossip about members of the team (positively, negatively), who they have had hooked-up with on the team, who they consider to be friends with on the team, whether they have to sabotaged or been sabotaged by any teammates, their well-being and feelings of loneliness.

Files

Steps to reproduce

Data were acquired online, using two Qualtrics surveys. The first survey collected participant names and consents. The second survey asked participants to list how often they gossip about members of the team (positively, negatively), who they have had hooked-up with on the team, who they consider to be friends with on the team, whether they have to sabotaged or been sabotaged by any teammates, General Well-Being Schedule (Fazio, 1977) and the R-UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell et al., 1980). Experimental Design, Materials, and Methods Participants on the Men’s and Women’s crew team were first approached to give consent to be involved in the study. All but one crew team members gave permission to be included in the study. A roster was created with team members who gave consent. Participants were then sent an online survey asking them how often they positively gossip about members of the team, negatively gossip about members of the team, spread hook-up gossip about members of the team, who they have had hooked-up with on the team, who they consider to be friends with on the team, whether they have sabotaged or been sabotaged by any teammates, General Well-Being Schedule [2], and the R-UCLA Loneliness Scale [3], and how many hook-up partners they have had at the university. Data cleaning. The raw data file was anonymized to protect the identity of the participants and is shared as “Gossip_and_Well-Being-RAW.csv” (also for SPSS “Gossip_and_Well-Being-RAW.sav”). Raw data was analyzed using “Gossip_and_Well-Being-SYNTAX.sps” (for text file version “Gossip_and_Well-Being-SYNTAX.rtf”. The Analyzed data is shared as “Gossip_and_Well-Being-ANALYZED.csv” (also for SPSS “Gossip_and_Well-Being-ANALYZED.sav”). The Analyzed data file has been expanded upon to include the following information: GWBS items 1 to 16, and items 24 and 25 were reverse coded. An overall GWBS score was derived by summing all GWBS items. RUCLA items 1, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 16, 19, and 20 were reverse coded. An overall RUCLA score was derived by summing all RUCLA items. All negative gossip, positive gossip, hook-up gossip, hook-up, have sabotaged others, been sabotaged, and friendship responses have also been recoded as a binary (Yes/No) response. In addition, incoming and outgoing network information were coded into separate variables.