Host plant range of Aproceros leucopoda is limited within Ulmaceae

Published: 11 March 2021| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/mcvx886nx5.1
Contributor:
Marta Ladanyi

Description

Rooted cuttings of U. pumila (material received from the Agricultural Private Shareholding Company of Törökszentmiklós, Hungary), seedlings of U. crassifolia and Z. serrata (Longó Nursery, Körösladány, Hungary), and young H. davidii plants originally growing spontaneously around older trees of the species, most likely as root suckers (National Botanical Garden, Vácrátót, Hungary), served as materials for the host-plant trials. The experiment was carried out by using cut shoots of each species, whereas plants of the same taxa in pots were also tested. In each case, the experiment was organized in a non-choice design. Aproceros leucopoda nymphs and pupae in cocoons attached to elm leaves were collected. The cocoons, each containing a juvenile A. leucopoda, were stored in organza bags at room temperature until adult emergence. 1-day-old females were taken from the bags and placed individually in separate Petri dishes. Each female was provided a freshly cut shoot with 2–3 leaves, and its base was submerged into water in a small plastic vial closed at its opening with wet cotton wool. There were six replicates per plant taxa (U. pumila, U. crassifolia, H. davidii and Z. serrata). The individuals in the twenty-four Petri dishes were reared in an environmental chamber. Oviposition was observed on a daily basis. The number of eggs laid by a female on a particular shoot was recorded, and then the shoot was isolated in a separate Petri dish. The adult which laid the eggs was transferred to another Petri dish with a new shoot of the same plant species on which it could continue ovipositing. The females were allowed to lay eggs for two days. Development of A. leucopoda on each plant species was followed on a daily basis from the day of oviposition until adult emergence provided these occurred. The appearance of the different stages (egg, larva, nymph, pupa and adult) was observed individually. Fresh pieces of shoots were regularly provided for the developing larvae until their development was completed. Oviposition trials by using plants in pots 1-day-old females were taken from the bags and placed individually in white organza bags tied on 4–6 leaved shoots of plants of the four taxa in pots, in six replicates. Oviposition was observed, and the number of eggs laid by a female on a particular shoot was recorded on a daily basis for two days. Hatching of larvae on each plant species was observed daily. The newly hatched larva was transferred to a cut shoot of the same taxon, on which it could continue its development. The developing larvae were supplied with fresh pieces of shoots regularly. The appearance of the different stages (nymph, pupa and adult) was observed individually.

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Steps to reproduce

Rooted cuttings of U. pumila (material received from the Agricultural Private Shareholding Company of Törökszentmiklós, Hungary), seedlings of U. crassifolia and Z. serrata (Longó Nursery, Körösladány, Hungary), and young H. davidii plants originally growing spontaneously around older trees of the species, most likely as root suckers (National Botanical Garden, Vácrátót, Hungary), served as materials for the host-plant trials. The experiment was carried out by using cut shoots of each species, whereas plants of the same taxa in pots were also tested. In each case, the experiment was organized in a non-choice design. Aproceros leucopoda nymphs and pupae in cocoons attached to elm leaves were collected. The cocoons, each containing a juvenile A. leucopoda, were stored in organza bags at room temperature until adult emergence. 1-day-old females were taken from the bags and placed individually in separate Petri dishes. Each female was provided a freshly cut shoot with 2–3 leaves, and its base was submerged into water in a small plastic vial closed at its opening with wet cotton wool. There were six replicates per plant taxa (U. pumila, U. crassifolia, H. davidii and Z. serrata). The individuals in the twenty-four Petri dishes were reared in an environmental chamber. Oviposition was observed on a daily basis. The number of eggs laid by a female on a particular shoot was recorded, and then the shoot was isolated in a separate Petri dish. The adult which laid the eggs was transferred to another Petri dish with a new shoot of the same plant species on which it could continue ovipositing. The females were allowed to lay eggs for two days. Development of A. leucopoda on each plant species was followed on a daily basis from the day of oviposition until adult emergence provided these occurred. The appearance of the different stages (egg, larva, nymph, pupa and adult) was observed individually. Fresh pieces of shoots were regularly provided for the developing larvae until their development was completed. Oviposition trials by using plants in pots 1-day-old females were taken from the bags and placed individually in white organza bags tied on 4–6 leaved shoots of plants of the four taxa in pots, in six replicates. Oviposition was observed, and the number of eggs laid by a female on a particular shoot was recorded on a daily basis for two days. Hatching of larvae on each plant species was observed daily. The newly hatched larva was transferred to a cut shoot of the same taxon, on which it could continue its development. The developing larvae were supplied with fresh pieces of shoots regularly. The appearance of the different stages (nymph, pupa and adult) was observed individually.