Austin_Survey_for_MDCOR_Analyses

Published: 14 November 2022| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/nb7yvhjvzk.1
Contributor:
Manuel Gonzalez Canche

Description

The city of Austin has administered a community survey for the 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 years (https://data.austintexas.gov/City-Government/Community-Survey/s2py-ceb7), to “assess satisfaction with the delivery of the major City Services and to help determine priorities for the community as part of the City’s ongoing planning process.” To directly access this dataset from the city of Austin’s website, you can follow this link https://cutt.ly/VNqq5Kd. Although we downloaded the dataset analyzed in this study from the former link, given that the city of Austin is interested in continuing administering this survey, there is a chance that the data we used for this analysis and the data hosted in the city of Austin’s website may differ in the following years. Accordingly, to ensure the replication of our findings, we recommend researchers to download and analyze the dataset we employed in our analyses, which can be accessed at the following link https://github.com/democratizing-data-science/MDCOR/blob/main/Community_Survey.csv. Replication Features or Variables The community survey data has 10,684 rows and 251 columns. Of these columns, our analyses will rely on the following three indicators that are taken verbatim from the survey: “ID”, “Q25 - If there was one thing you could share with the Mayor regarding the City of Austin (any comment, suggestion, etc.), what would it be?", and “Do you own or rent your home?”

Files

Steps to reproduce

The city of Austin has administered a community survey for the 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 years (https://data.austintexas.gov/City-Government/Community-Survey/s2py-ceb7), to “assess satisfaction with the delivery of the major City Services and to help determine priorities for the community as part of the City’s ongoing planning process.” To reproduce the analyses obtained in the paper Machine Driven Classification of Open-ended Responses (MDCOR): An Analytic Framework and No-Code Free Software Application to Classify Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Text Responses in Survey and Social Media Research Expert Systems With Applications you need three columns: “ID”, “Q25 - If there was one thing you could share with the Mayor regarding the City of Austin (any comment, suggestion, etc.), what would it be?", and “Do you own or rent your home?”

Institutions

University of Pennsylvania

Categories

Data Science, Natural Language Processing, Computational Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Visualization, Mixed Research Method, Text Processing, Survey Methodology, Text Mining

Funding

Sage Foundation

Spencer Foundation

National Academy of Education

License