Compartmental Fire Temperature Data from Body and Platform-mounted Sensors in Live Fire-Suppression Exercises

Published: 17 October 2019| Version 3 | DOI: 10.17632/pn7y7sskc7.3
Contributors:
Syed Adnan,
David Garrity,
Daniel Harrison,
Clive Savage

Description

The data comprises of time-stamped temperature values in degrees Celsius recorded during fire-suppression exercises conducted at various UK and US fire-training facilities. The first day of the visit was split into two burn sessions as follows: • The first being a demonstration of gas cooling performed in a “lay-flat” chamber. • The second being a re-qualification exercise performed in the multi-compartment chamber. Day 1 - Session 1: Lay-flat chamber Two TMRDs (#5 & #6) were worn in the torch clips on the breathing apparatus (BA) harnesses by the instructors during their demonstration of the “gas cooling” technique for controlling a fire. The fire was lit in the right hand corner of the chamber and as the demonstrations progresses with the fire being allowed to repeatedly develop and then “gas cooling” being deployed the fire progressed to include the fuel in the left hand corner of the chamber. The data logged temperatures show the cycles and the effect of the “gas cooling” technique. Day 1 – Session 2: Multi-compartment chamber Three TMRDs (#5, #7 and #8) were worn in the same position as before by the instructors during the re-qualification exercise (Figure 3). Two other TMRDs were attached to a stand at 1.3m high (#6) and 1.7m high (#9) and the stand was placed in the corner of the burn chamber for the duration of the exercise. The second day was again split into two burn sessions utilising the “Industrial B” building with the firefighting team using standard operating procedures to extinguish the fires. 1.1 Day 2 - Session 1: Top-floor industrial unit B Session 1 was conducted on the upper floor of the building which has a high ceiling where 2 double loadings of fuel were used. Three TMRD units were deployed, one on the helmet and one at chest height on the team fighting the fire and the third on the observer at shoulder height. In this session, 3 TMRDs were used with #B mounted on the helmet of one of the firefighters tackling the burn, #D mounted on the chest of the other firefighter and #C was on the shoulder of the observer. 1.2 Day 2 - Session 2: Lower-floor industrial unit B Session 2 was conducted on the lower floor of the building which has a standard height ceiling where 1 double and 1 single loading of fuel were used. In this session, a total of three TMRD units were deployed, one on the helmet and one at shoulder height on the team fighting the fire and the third on the observer at shoulder height In this session, one double and one single fuel load were utilised and the fire allowed to develop before a firefighting team entered the building and dealt with the fire using their standard operation procedures. The team consisted of two firefighters to tackle the fire and a third to observe and report progress over a radio link where 3 TMRDs were used with #B mounted on the helmet of one of the firefighters tackling the burn, #D mounted on the shoulder of the other firefighter and #C was on the shoulder of the observer.

Files

Steps to reproduce

The data was recorded at a rate of 2Hz. The file naming convention shows "60s" tagging which was only used for development purposes and has no relevance to the actual dataset. The file timestamps are formatted as TMPLOG_YYYYMMDDhhmmss. The zipped files have two columns with the first column representing the timestamps and the other containing the temperature values in degrees Celsius. Any sliding window mechanism can hence be developed by capturing these values in sequence.

Categories

Artificial Neural Networks, Compartment Fire, Fire Detection, Fire Alarm, Convolutional Neural Network, Recurrent Neural Network, Fire

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