Data for: Intuitive Blaming of Peeping Toms Versus Cyber Peepers

Published: 17-10-2018| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/snpbvgfgcw.1
Contributors:
Carl Jago,
Arseny Ryazanov,
Nicholas Christenfeld

Description

In a series of studies, we examine the existence and factors underlying a blaming discrepancy between responses to a cyber peeper and to a peeping Tom. The first study demonstrates reduced blame for a cyber peeper, and the subsequent eight studies hone in on major differences between the cyber peeping and peeping Tom scenarios that may contribute to a blaming discrepancy, such as the effort involved on the part of the peeper and the risk-taking on the part of the victim. Four of eight such factors are found to impact blame. We then compare responses to cyber peeping and peeping Tom scenarios that are roughly matched on these four factors to assess whether such matching equalizes blame. Finally, we compare blame for the viewing of a private nude photo on the Internet with blame for the viewing of a private nude photo printed on paper in order to assess whether blame is influenced by the involvement of Internet technology itself, rather than by the other factors the technology brings with it. Study 1 examines the existence and the magnitude of any blaming discrepancy by comparing blame for a regular peeping Tom with blame for a cyber peeper. Studies 2 through 9 explore differences between the cyber peeping and peeping Tom scenarios that might contribute to a blaming discrepancy. Study 2 - Victim Celebrity Status Study 3 - Higher vs Lower Victim Risk Study 4 - Higher vs Lower Perp. Effort Study 5 - Prurience vs Curiosity Study 6 - More vs Fewer other peepers Study 7 - Still vs Live-Streaming Media Study 8 - Distance Study 9 - Middleman Involvement Study 10 matches scenarios on factors found to impact blame in these scenarios to test whether such matching equalizes blame. Study 11 compares photo viewing in person which photo viewing on the internet to test whether the internet itself impacts blame.

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