Framing the Inclusiveness of the National Ingroup: Do Identity-Related Frames Affect National Identity Representations Salience?

Published: 3 January 2023| Version 1 | DOI: 10.17632/v6s34r4bkt.1
Contributors:
Natalia Bogado,
Evelyn Bytzek,
Melanie Steffens

Description

Overview: In this dataset, we experimentally test the effect of exposure to information about Syrian refugees in Germany in either multicultural or assimilation terms on a range of attitudes (e.g., national identity representations (NIR), frame content and valence perception, prejudice towards Syrian refugees, asylum policy preferences, intergroup threat perception, acculturation host preferences, immigration attitudes, need for cognition). See Codebook attached for full details on variables. Procedure: The data was collected in two waves. Participants in Wave 1 began by providing sociodemographic data, including their religion, place of birth and that of their parents, followed by questions on their NIR salience, outgroup prejudice, asylum policy preferences, acculturation preferences, immigration attitudes, and intergroup threat perception. In Wave 2, participants were asked to read a text simulating a newspaper article presented to participants as coming from a reputable but undisclosed source (to ensure the manipulation was not affected by attitudes towards the cited source). Immediately after the manipulation, participants were again asked about their NIR salience, outgroup prejudice, asylum policy preferences, acculturation preferences, immigration attitudes, intergroup threat perception, and perceptions of frame content and valence. Finally, respondents were debriefed. As frame content and valence perception were measured after NIR salience, question order could not affect the observed framing effects. See Codebook attached for full details on procedures or contact bogado@uni-landau.de for any questions. Materials: The stimulus materials were designed to manipulate the perception that the information presented (on refugees and asylum policies) was framed in assimilation or multicultural terms. We used news items (one per condition) which elaborated on a report conducted by a (fictitious) German policy think tank analyzing the impact of asylum and integration policies on Syrian refugees living in Germany. In the multicultural condition, the article (298 words in length) framed the report findings in multicultural terms (“Cultural diversity is essential for peaceful coexistence in society; lack of respect for diversity and minorities threatens the values of the German society”). In the assimilation condition, the article (297 words) framed the report findings in assimilation terms (“Cultural homogeneity is essential for peaceful coexistence in society; lack of respect for national traditions and values threatens the values of the German society”). To increase ecological validity, the articles were fictional but based on real articles that framed information in identity-related terms. In turn, to ensure a high internal validity, the articles in both conditions were identical except for the manipulations. See Codebook attached for full details on materials or contact bogado@uni-landau.de for any questions.

Files

Steps to reproduce

The dataset attached is the clean one used in the published study (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147176722001675?via%3Dihub). For the raw dataset and for more information about replicating findings and the procedures we followed, please contact Natalia Bogado (bogado@uni-landau.de).

Institutions

Universitat Koblenz-Landau

Categories

Social Psychology, Asylum, Immigration, Intergroup Relations, Communication Psychology

Funding

This research was funded by the “Media, Democracy and Citizens” (MeDeCi) research group at the University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

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