Journal of Research in Personality

ISSN: 0092-6566
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Datasets associated with articles published in Journal of Research in Personality
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  • Coding of all studies including the moderators.
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    • Tabular Data
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  • Survey data from 2 samples; Instagram coding for Phase 1 sample and ratings by perceivers; Instagram coding for Phase 2 sample including ratings of targets
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  • Data used in Study 1 of the paper "On the Determinants of Other-Regarding Behavior: Field Tests of the Moral Foundations Questionnaire" by O'Grady, Vandegrift, Wolek and Burr. The dataset connects an individual's responses to the Moral Foundations Questionnaire with their decision to return a follow-up survey. Data were manually entered from paper surveys. We recruited 397 undergraduate students (45% female) of mostly business school majors across 18 undergraduate class sections at a mid-sized public college in the eastern U.S. Of these 397 students, 17 opted out of the study. This dataset includes the 380 individuals in the survey, of which 22 returned incomplete questionnaires and 21 failed attention check questions resulting in a final sample of 337 students.
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  • these three data sets were used for the paper: Differentiating Conscientious from Indiscriminate Responders in Existing NEO-Five Factor Inventory-3 Data by Zdravko Marjanovic and Ronald R. Holden
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    • Software/Code
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  • The data for the manuscript: Striving for Change: The Prevalence and Correlates of Personality Change Goals
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    • Tabular Data
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  • Sample 2, Aims 2-4
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    • Software/Code
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  • Across three studies, Murray, Rose, Bellavia, Holmes, and Kusche (2002) found that low self-esteem individuals responded in a negative manner compared to those high in self-esteem in the face of relationship threat, perceiving their partners and relationships less positively. This was the first empirical support for the hypothesized dynamics of a dependency regulation perspective, and has had a significant impact on the field of relationship science. In the present research, we sought to reproduce the methods and procedures of Study 3 of Murray et al. (2002) to further test the two-way interaction between individual differences in self-esteem and situational relationship threat. Manipulation check effects replicated the original study, but no interaction between self-esteem and experimental condition was observed for any primary study outcomes.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code