Social Science & Medicine
ISSN: 0277-9536
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This file contains raw and processed replication data, as well as source code for analysis, for the paper. Data.txt contains the raw citations data extracted from Web of Science. Cosine.csv contains the cosine similarity matrix based on bibliometric coupling. The cosine measurements are obtained by using Loet Leydesdorff's BibJourn.exe application on data.txt. See AMR Fig 2 for more details. Cr.csv contains the number of citations for the top outlets. Fig1.csv contains data comparing the number of citations in AMR and other global health emergencies. AMR Fig1.R contains the source code for Figure 1. AMR Fig2.R contains the source code for Figure 2.
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Medical consultation observation guide
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Qualitative interview guide
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Aggregate measures of health inequalities and associated correlates
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Data and do file for: "Does Genetic Risk for Common Adult Diseases Influence Reproductive Plans? Evidence from a National Survey Experiment in the United States"
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A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The India Human Development Survey-II (IHDS-II), 2011-12 is a nationally representative, multi-topic survey of 42,152 households in 1,503 villages and 971 urban neighborhoods across India. These data are mostly re-interviews of households interviewed for IHDS-I (ICPSR 22626) in 2004-05. Two one-hour interviews in each household covered topics concerning health, education, employment, economic status, marriage, fertility, gender relations, social capital, village infrastructure, wage levels, and panchayat composition. Children aged 8-11 completed short reading, writing and arithmetic tests. The IHDS-II data are assembled in fourteen datasets: Individual; Household; Eligible Women; Birth History; Medical Staff; Medical Facilities; Non Resident; School Staff; School Facilities; Wage and Salary; Tracking; Village; Village Panchayat; Village Respondent;,Response Rates: 85 percent of 2004-05 households were re-interviewed.,Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Individual DS2: Household DS3: Eligible Women DS4: Birth History DS5: Medical Staff DS6: Medical Facilities DS7: Non Resident DS8: School Staff DS9: School Facilities DS10: Wage and Salary DS11: Tracking DS12: Village DS13: Village Panchayat DS14: Village Respondent,India Human Development Survey (IHDS) Series,cognitive assessment test,face-to-face interview,paper and pencil interview (PAPI),Nationally representative sample of the Indian population. Smallest Geographic Unit: district,All 2004-05 households residing in the same village or urban neighborhood were re-interviewed. When households had divided, all split households were re-interviewed if located in the same village/neighborhood. For some urban PSUs where it was difficult to re-contact sufficient households, additional new households were randomly sampled and interviewed.,
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These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by NACDA or ICPSR at this time; the original materials provided by the principal investigator were minimally processed and converted to other file types for ease of use. As the study is further processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR, users will be able to access the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support and we will work with you to resolve any data related issues.The Biomarker study is Project 4 of the MIDUS longitudinal study, a national survey of more than 7,000 Americans (aged 25 to 74) begun in 1994. The purpose of the larger study was to investigate the role of behavioral, psychological, and social factors in understanding age-related differences in physical and mental health. With support from the National Institute on Aging, a longitudinal follow-up of the original MIDUS samples [core sample (N = 3,487), metropolitan over-samples (N = 757), twins (N = 957 pairs), and siblings (N = 950)] was conducted in 2004-2006. Guiding hypotheses, at the most general level, were that behavioral and psychosocial factors are consequential for health (physical and mental). A description of the study and findings from it are available on the MIDUS Web site. The Biomarker Project (Project 4) of MIDUS II contains data from 1,255 respondents. These respondents include two distinct subsamples, all of whom completed the Project 1 Survey: (1) longitudinal survey sample (n = 1,054) and (2) Milwaukee sample (n = 201). The Milwaukee group contained individuals who participated in the baseline MIDUS Milwaukee study, initiated in 2005. The purpose of the Biomarker Project (Project 4) was to add comprehensive biological assessments on a subsample of MIDUS respondents, thus facilitating analyses that integrate behavioral and psychosocial factors with biology. The broad aim is to identify biopsychosocial pathways that contribute to diverse health outcomes. A further theme is to investigate protective roles that behavioral and psychosocial factors have in delaying morbidity and mortality, or in fostering resilience and recovery from health challenges once they occur. The research was not disease-specific, given that psychosocial factors have relevance across multiple health endpoints. Biomarker data collection was carried out at three General Clinical Research Centers (at UCLA, University of Wisconsin, and Georgetown University). The biomarkers reflect functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the autonomic nervous system, the immune system, cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system, antioxidants, and metabolic processes. Our specimens (fasting blood draw, 12-hour urine, saliva) allow for assessment of multiple indicators within these major systems. The protocol also included assessments by clinicians or trained staff, including vital signs, morphology, functional capacities, bone densitometry, medication usage, and a physical exam. Project staff obtained indicators of heart-rate variability, beat to beat blood pressure, respiration, and salivary cortisol assessments during an experimental protocol that included both a cognitive and orthostatic challenge. Finally, to augment the self-reported data collected in Project 1, participants completed a medical history, self-administered questionnaire, and self-reported sleep assessments. For respondents at one site (UW-Madison), objective sleep assessments were also obtained with an Actiwatch(R) activity monitor. The MIDUS and MIDJA Biomarker Clinic Visits include collection of comprehensive information about medications of all types, as well as basic information about allergic reactions to any type of medication. Respondents were instructed to bring all their medications, or information about their medications, to the clinic visit to ensure the information about those medications was recorded accurately. Information regarding Prescription Medications (FDA approved medications prescribed by someone authorized/licensed under the Western medical tradition, or medications prescribed by individuals authorized under Japanese law to prescribe Western and/or Eastern/Chinese traditional medicine), Quasi Medications (including Over the Counter Medications i.e. vitamins, minerals, non-prescription pain relief, antacids, etc. that can be purchased without a prescription) and Alternative Medications (i.e. herbs, herbal blends (excluding herbal teas), homeopathic remedies, and other alternative remedies that may be purchased over the counter or "prescribed" by a health care practitioner trained in a non-western tradition)was collected at this time.The following information was collected for each medication type Medication name, dosage, and route of administration; How often the medication is taken(frequency); How long the participant has been taking a given medication; Why they think they are taking the medication; After basic cleaning protocols were completed, standardized protocols were applied to both MIDUS and MIDJA medication data to link medications first to Generic Names and associated DrugIDs and then to therapeutic and pharmacologic class information from the Lexicomp Lexi-Data database, and also to code text data describing why participants think they are taking a given medication. The scope of this collected medication data lends itself to within person analysis of medication use, thus the medication data are also released in a standalone stacked format. The stacked file only contains data about medications used where each case represents an individual medication, thus it does not include any data about medication allergies.,ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created variable labels and/or value labels.; Created online analysis version with question text.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..,Presence of Common Scales: Data users interested in the scales used for this study should refer to the scaling documentation provided on both the ICPSR and NACDA Web site.,Response Rates: The response rate was 39.3 percent for each of the 2 samples (longitudinal survey sample, and Milwaukee).,Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Aggregated Data DS2: Stacked Medication Data,Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Series,face-to-face interview,mixed mode,on-site questionnaire,Adult non-institutionalized population of the United States. Smallest Geographic Unit: No geographic information is included other than for the Milwaukee cases.,All respondents participating in MIDUS II (ICPSR 4652) or the Milwaukee study (ICPSR 22840) who completed Project 1 were eligible to participate in the Biomarker assessments.,
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The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2008 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).,Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection.,Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent; Wave II: 88.6 percent; Wave III: 77.4 percent; Wave IV: 80.3 percent;,Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights,audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI), computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI), computer-assisted self interview (CASI), face-to-face interview, paper and pencil interview (PAPI) The current release represents a full collection update. All data and documentation files have been resupplied by the Principal Investigators and have been fully curated by ICPSR. ICPSR has revised dataset names and numbers to better reflect the organization of the collection by study wave. Users should be aware that version history notes dated prior to 2015-11-09 do not apply to the current organization of the datasets. Please note that dates present in the Summary and Time Period fields are taken from the Add Health Study Design page. The Date of Collection field represents the range of interview dates present in the data files for each wave. Wave I and Wave II field work was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Wave III and Wave IV field work was conducted by the Research Triangle Institute. For the most updated list of related publications, please see the Add Health Publications Web site. Additional information on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) series can be found on the Add Health Web site.,Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States.,Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample.; Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I.; Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later.; Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. ; For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page.,
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This file provides data on federal, state, and local governmental expenditures and employment for criminal justice activities in the United States. Information is supplied on police protection, judicial and legal services, and correctional institutions and agencies. Variables describing each of these criminal justice functions include number of and payroll for full-time, part-time, and full-time-equivalent employees, current total and general expenditures, capital outlay, and intergovernmental expenditures.,ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Performed consistency checks.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..,Datasets: DS1: Dataset,Expenditure and Employment Data for the Criminal Justice System Series,The codebook for this collection is provided by ICPSR as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided on the ICPSR Web site.,All federal, state, and local governments in the United States.,Larger governments were selected with certainty. Smaller governments were selected using probability sampling based on a ratio of governmental expenditures or indebtedness to the total expenditures and indebtedness of all noncertainty governments in specified groups.,
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The Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) is a collaborative, interdisciplinary investigation of patterns, predictors, and consequences of midlife development in the areas of physical health, psychological well-being, and social responsibility. A description of the study and findings from it are available at http://www.midus.wisc.edu. The first wave of the MIDUS study (MIDUS 1 or M1) collected survey data from a total of 7,108 participants. The baseline sample was comprised of individuals from four subsamples: (1) a national RDD (random digit dialing) sample (n=3,487); (2) oversamples from five metropolitan areas in the U.S. (n=757); (3) siblings of individuals from the RDD sample (n=950); and (4) a national RDD sample of twin pairs (n=1,914). All eligible participants were non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults in the coterminous United States, aged 25 to 74. Data from the samples were collected primarily in 1995/96. The survey (Project 1) dataset contains responses from a 30-minute Phone interview and two 50-page Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) instruments. Of the 7,108 respondents who completed the Phone interview, 6,325 also completed the SAQ. This updated version of the study is comprised of three primary datasets: Dataset 1, Main, Siblings, and Twin Data, contains responses from the main survey of 7,108 respondents. Respondents were asked to provide extensive information on their physical and mental health throughout their adult lives, and to assess the ways in which their lifestyles, including relationships and work-related demands, contributed to the conditions experienced. Those queried were asked to describe their histories of physical ailments, including heart-related conditions and cancer, as well as the treatment and/or lifestyle changes they went through as a result. A series of questions addressed alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use, and focused on history of use, regularity of use, attempts to quit, and how the use of those substances affected respondents' physical and mental well-being. Additional questions addressed respondents' sense of control over their health, their awareness of changes in their medical conditions, commitment to regular exercise and a healthy diet, experience with menopause, the decision-making process used to deal with health concerns, experiences with nontraditional remedies or therapies, and history of attending support groups. Respondents were asked to compare their overall well-being with that of their peers and to describe social, physical, and emotional characteristics typical of adults in their 20's, 40's, and 60's. Information on the work histories of respondents and their significant others was also elicited, with items covering the nature of their occupations, work-related physical and emotional demands, and how their personal health had correlated to their jobs. An additional series of questions focusing on childhood queried respondents regarding the presence/absence of their parents, religion, rules/punishments, love/affection, physical/verbal abuse, and the quality of their relationships with their parents and siblings. Respondents were also asked to consider their personal feelings of accomplishment, desire to learn, sense of control over their lives, interests, and hopes for the future. The Datasets previously numbered 2 and 3 have been removed to avoid redundancies, and all datasets have been renumbered. Please refer to the readme file. Dataset 2, Twin Screener Data, provides the first national sample of twin pairs ascertained randomly via the telephone. Dataset 3, Coded Text Responses, describes how open-ended textual responses in the MIDUS 1 Computer-Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) and Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) were transformed into categorical numeric codes. These codes are included in a stand-alone dataset containing only those cases (N=3,950) that contained text data in their responses. Online Analysis Only: Datasets 1, 2, and 3 were merged together by the SU_ID variable to form "Merged Data with Weights (Online Analysis Only)" (Dataset 4) for online analysis capabilities. MIDUS also maintains a Colectica portal, which allows users to interact with variables across waves and create customized subsets. Registration is required.,ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created online analysis version with question text.; Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes..,Presence of Common Scales: Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) Scale; Somatic Amplification Scale; The Alcohol Screening Test; The Conflict Tactics (CT) Scales; The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2); Loyola Generativity Scale (LGS); Many scales were constructed for use in the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS 1), 1995-1996 Study. For additional information on scale construction and sources, please refer to the scale documentation included with the data collection.,Response Rates: The response rate for the national Random-Digit Dialing (RDD) sample was 70 percent. The Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) follow-up response rate was 89 percent.,Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Main, Siblings and Twin Data DS2: Twin Screener Data DS3: Coded Text Data DS4: Merged Data with Weights (Online Analysis Only) DS6: Midlife in the United States (MIDUS 1), 1995-1996, Merged Data with Weights (Online Analysis Only),Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Series,computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI),mail questionnaire,self-enumerated questionnaire,Respondents were drawn from a nationally representative random-digit-dial sample of non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults, aged 25-74, selected from working telephone banks in the coterminous United States. Those queried participated in an initial telephone interview and responded to a mail questionnaire. Smallest Geographic Unit: None,Respondents were drawn from a nationally representative random-digit-dial sample of non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults, aged 25-74, selected from working telephone banks in the coterminous United States. Those queried participated in an initial telephone interview and responded to a mail questionnaire. Please see the Descriptions of Midlife in the United Sates (MIDUS) Samples documentation provided by ICPSR for more detailed information.,
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