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20385642 results
  • Supplementary Information - Sociodemographic, clinical, and patient-reported characteristics associated with multiple biologic failure in psoriasis: a prospective cohort study
    Supplementary Information - Sociodemographic, clinical, and patient-reported characteristics associated with multiple biologic failure in psoriasis: a prospective cohort study
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  • A delicate balance between antibody evasion and ACE2 affinity for Omicron BA.2.75. Huo et al
    Supplementary Figures, Tables and Videos for the following paper published in Cell Reports: A delicate balance between antibody evasion and ACE2 affinity for Omicron BA.2.75 Jiandong Huo1,2,3,#,*, Aiste Dijokaite-Guraliuc4,#, Chang Liu4,5,#, Raksha Das4, Piyada Supasa4, Muneeswaran Selvaraj4, Rungtiwa Nutalai4, Daming Zhou2,5, Alexander J. Mentzer4,7, Donal Skelly7,8,9, Thomas G. Ritter7, Ali Amini7,8,10, Sagida Bibi11, Sandra Adele7, Sile Ann Johnson7, Neil G. Paterson6, Mark A. Williams6, David R. Hall6, Megan Plowright12,13, Thomas A.H. Newman12,13, Hailey Hornsby12, Thushan I de Silva12,13, Nigel Temperton14, Paul Klenerman7,8,10,15, Eleanor Barnes7,8,10,15, Susanna J. Dunachie7,8,16,17, Andrew J Pollard11,15, Teresa Lambe5,11, Philip Goulder8,18, OPTIC consortium&, ISARIC4C consortium$, Elizabeth E. Fry2*, Juthathip Mongkolsapaya4,5,*, Jingshan Ren2,*, David I. Stuart2,5,6,*,^, Gavin R Screaton4,5,* 1. State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Health, the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China 2. Division of Structural Biology, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, The Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK 3. Guangzhou Laboratory, Bio-island, Guangzhou 510320, China 4. Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK 5. Chinese Academy of Medical Science (CAMS) Oxford Institute (COI), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK 6. Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science & Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK
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  • Determinants socioeconomic factors for quality of life and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling older people: a cross-sectional study in Brazil and Portugal
    The study aimed to analyze the association between the socioeconomic profile and the Quality of Life (QoL) of elderly people with depressive symptoms assisted in Primary Health Care (PHC) in Brazil and Portugal. This is a comparative cross-sectional study with a non-probabilistic sample of elderly people from PHC in Brazil and Portugal, carried out between 2018 and 2018. To assess the variables of interest, a form containing socioeconomic data, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS- 15) and the Medical Outcomes Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). We performed descriptive and multivariate analyzes to test the study hypothesis. The sample consisted of n=150 participants (Brazil n=100 and Portugal n=50). There was similarity in some variables of the socioeconomic profile of both groups, with predominance in the total sample of females (76.0% / p = 0.224) and of individuals aged between 65 and 80 years (88.0% - p = 0.594 ). However, in Brazil, less education (79.0%/ p = 0.001) and participants who did not live alone (86.0%/ p = 0.001) stood out. In Portugal, all participants had an income lower than the minimum wage (100.0% / p <0.001). There is also a predominance of symptoms in the group from Brazil (59.0%) (p=0.015 / OR= 1.81 - 95%CI= 1.12 – 2.81). When performing the multivariate association analysis between socioeconomic variables, presence of depressive symptoms and QoL, we selected and presented the most relevant results in Table 5. It is noted that the Mental Health domain was the domain that was most associated with socioeconomic variables. Among them, the female gender (p= 0.027), age group 65-80 years (p=0.042), marital status “without a partner” (p=0.029), education of up to 5 years (p=0.011) and income of up to 1 minimum wage (p=0.037). In all these variables, higher scores were observed in the group from Brazil. With higher scores in Portugal, the General Health Status domain was associated with female gender (p= 0.042) and education of up to 5 years (p=0.045). In addition, the physical aspect domain was associated with income of up to 1 minimum wage. The results revealed the existence of an association between the socioeconomic profile and the QoL in the presence of depressive symptoms. This association was observed mainly among females, low education and low income with aspects of QoL related to mental, physical and social health and self-perception of health. The group from Brazil had higher QoL scores compared to Portugal.
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  • Supplementary materials to "A Systematic Review of Social Robots in Public Spaces: Threat Landscape and Attack Surface"
    This is an archived online supplementary material for the journal article "A Systematic Review of Social Robots in Public Spaces: Threat Landscape and Attack Surface." In this archive, you will find the replication package, dataset, data extraction checklist, quality assessment questions and a complete list of all the primary studies of this SLR. The replication package consists of an information source, search result URLs and a spreadsheet repository. Our information source lists five digital libraries from which we searched for eligible primary studies. We included our search URLs and the search string to facilitate easy replication of our results. The attached spreadsheet titled repository has three sheets; filtering, quotes and primary studies. The filtering pages consist of all 1469 studies that satisfied our search criteria and the reason for excluding any paper. The sheet titled quotes show all quotes from our primary studies supporting our extracted data. The last spreadsheet, titled primary studies, contains a complete list of all extracted information for our primary studies. The data extraction checklist and quality assessment questions for this SLR are also attached as supplementary materials.
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  • Entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurship intention of Business and Accounting undergraduate students
    The data describes the dimensions of entrepreneurship education (EE) that influences the intention (EI) of undergraduate students of Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria. The data was collected across three sets (3-year period) of undergraduate students after completing three entrepreneurship courses. Attitude towards EE was measured with 21-items to assess three components of attitude towards EE (cognitive, affective and behavioural). EI was measured using a multi-item, 6-item scale. To measure EE, the data used 20-items representing four dimensions; perceived competence of entrepreneurship lecturers, adequacy of facilities/equipment, adequacy of instructional materials and relevance of EE curriculum contents.
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  • Physical and biogenic complexity mediates ecosystem functions in urban sessile marine communities
    Dataset associated with the paper "Physical and biogenic complexity mediates ecosystem functions in urban sessile marine communities" (2022) published in Journal of Applied Ecology. Abstract: 1 – The influence of habitat complexity on biodiversity is a central theme in ecology, with many studies reporting positive relationships. Reconciliation approaches in urbanised areas, such as eco-engineering, have increasingly focused on ‘re-building’ the complexity of degraded and/or homogenised habitats to support biodiversity. Yet the effects of increasing complexity and biodiversity on ecological functions are rarely measured. 2 – We assessed how increasing the physical and/or biogenic complexity of habitats affects the net and gross primary productivity (NPP and GPP, respectively), community respiration and nutrient cycling (specifically dissolved inorganic phosphorus and nitrogen) of intertidal sessile marine communities at three sites. We manipulated physical complexity using two types of settlement tiles: ‘complex’, with crevices and ridges, and ‘flat’. We increased biogenic complexity on half the replicates of each tile type by seeding with oysters. 3 – Increased physical and biogenic complexity resulted in greater sessile species richness at all sites. Although many variables assessed varied with sites and time of measurements, overall, GPP and NPP was greater on flat tiles than on complex ones. These patterns were not explained by differences in the total surface area of tiles.. 5 – Daily flux rates of Dissolved inorganic phosphorus had a significant positive relationship with biogenic complexity. There were no effects of biogenic or physical complexity on the net fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. 6 – Effects of habitat complexity on the productivity and nutrient cycling of marine sessile communities were largely unrelated to diversity measures, such as richness or abundance of key taxa and functional groups. Synthesis and applications: Eco-engineering practices that manipulate habitat complexity might benefit from explicit functional targets that also consider associated ecosystem services, as we found that under some conditions there is a trade-off between biodiversity and functional targets. Our results suggest that increasing habitat complexity has a positive effect on sessile species richness, but not necessarily on productivity (GPP and NPP). The species pool available as well as light availability is likely to mediate effects of complexity on assemblages, so local environment needs to be a key consideration when designing interventions.
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  • Facial Tightening Using a Novel Vacuum-Attracted Microneedle Fractional Radiofrequency System: A Prospective, Randomized, Split-Face Study
    Facial Tightening Using a Novel Vacuum-Attracted Microneedle Fractional Radiofrequency System: A Prospective, Randomized, Split-Face Study Supplementary Documents Supplementary Fig. 1 Patient enrollment and treatment randomization. Supplementary Fig. 2 Comparisons of the visual analog scale (VAS) scores; volumetric changes of the lower eyelid, midface, and mandible; changes in the number of facial wrinkles on the treated and control sides of each patient before treatment and 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment. Supplementary Fig. 3 A 62-year-old woman before treatment and 3 and 6 months after the last treatment (A–C). A significant improvement in the right-side eye bags was observed. Before treatment (A), 3 months after the last treatment (B), and 6 months after the last treatment (C). Supplementary Fig. 4 A 35-year-old man before treatment (A) and 3 (B) and 6 (C) months after the last treatment. A significant improvement was observed. The contour of the mandible was significantly improved on the right side of the face (treatment side). Supplementary Fig. 5 A 49-year-old woman before treatment (A, C, E, G) and 6 months (B, D, F, H) after the last treatment. A significant improvement in the periorbital wrinkles on the right side of the face was observed. (A–D) VISIA detected periorbital wrinkles; (E–H) a 3D camera detected the improvement of periorbital wrinkles. Supplementary Fig. 6 A 3D camera detected the effect of facial volume changes. A 40-year-old female, before treatment (A, C, E, G, I, K) and 6 months (B, D, F, H, J, L) after treatment. On the treatment side (right side of the face), the mid-face, mandibular margin, and submental volumes were significantly reduced. Supplementary Table 1 Patient satisfaction scale and adverse events.
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  • Key methodological aspects and major findings of reviewed studies
    Key methodological aspects and major findings of reviewed studies on Moral Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Military Population
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  • Vulnerability
    Strutural, economic and social data collected in dairy farms located at Parana State, Brazil
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  • JDS22271
    Supplementary material for JDS22271 (Selective treatment of nonsevere clinical mastitis does not adversely affect cure, somatic cell count, milk yield, recurrence, or culling: A systematic review and meta-analysis).
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