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  • The Modified Back Beliefs Questionnaire as a tool to screen for incorrect beliefs regarding back pain: Cross-cultural adaptation and measurement properties
    Background: The Modified Back Beliefs Questionnaire (MBBQ) evaluates and screen for incorrect beliefs about low back pain (LBP). MBBQ measurement properties remain unknown therefore, a rigorous cross-cultural validation is necessary. Objective: To translate and cross-culturally adapt the MBBQ into Brazilian Portuguese and investigate its measurement properties among physical therapists. Methods: The MBBQ was translated and cross-culturally adapted into Brazilian Portuguese and tested in 30 physical therapists. Then, we evaluated the measurement properties related to reliability and validity in a sample of 100 physical therapists. For the reliability analysis, we calculated test-retest reliability, internal consistency, standard error of the measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC). The Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale for Physiotherapists (PABS.PT) was used in the construct validity analysis. Results: The reliability analysis showed high internal consistency, good to excellent test-retest reproducibility. The MBBQ inevitability and composite scores showed SEM of 1.9 and 2.4 points and MDC of 5.1 and 6.7 points, respectively. Construct validity analyses showed moderate to excellent correlation of the MBBQ scores and the biomedical subscale of the PABS.PT. Conclusions: MBBQ showed acceptable measurement properties and may be considered a reliable and valid tool to assess patients' beliefs about low back pain.
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  • ISCIENCE
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is the main pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). Autophagy is an important regulatory pathway to eliminate intracellular Mtb. However, how Mtb escapes autophagy clearance remains largely unclear. Here, we found that microRNA-25 (miR-25) expression was significantly upregulated in the lung tissues of mice infected with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and macrophages infected with Mtb or BCG, especially in the early stages of infection. MiR-25 can significantly increase the survival of Mtb and BCG in macrophages. We validated that miR-25 targets the NPC1 protein located on the lysosomal membrane, resulting in damage to lysosomal function, thereby inhibiting autophagolysosome formation and promoting the survival of Mtb and BCG. Consistently, mice lacking miR-25 exhibited more resistant to BCG infection. In addition, we found that Rv1759c induces the expression of miR-25 through NFKB inhibitor zeta (NFKBIZ). Together, we reveal a new mechanism by which Mtb regulates NPC1 to influence lysosomal function and increase the survival of Mtb through the autophagy pathway, providing an early biomarker for TB infection and a new treatment strategy against TB.
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  • Sedimentary Xenoliths of the Mesozoic Nicoya Complex, Costa Rica – Data Record from the Playa Arbolito Forearc Basement Assemblage, Nicoya Peninsula
    The dataset consists of ten individual research data files over the Cretaceous sedimentary xenolith field of Playa Arbolito, exposed on the western Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica (Fig. S1). The data record a unique assemblage of radiolarite, radiolarian chert, chert, siliceous tuffaceous mudstone, and glassy pyroclastic xenoliths hosted in basalt of the Mesozoic forearc basement succession (Fig. S2-S3), called the Nicoya Complex after Dengo (1962). The data were gathered during two different field research campaigns in February 2012 and March 2017. While the 2012 research centered on xenoliths and their host rocks found at Playa Arbolito (Fig. S1), the 2017 campaign dealt in addition with potential xenolith source-rock strata contained in Cretaceous sedimentary sections of the interior Peninsula and NE Gulf of Nicoya coast (e.g., Sardinal, Manzanillo sections) (Table S1). Further key data come from detailed micropaleontological, sedimentological, and volcanological rock examinations in outcrop and laboratory. The dataset includes furthermore a newly detailed examination of Schmidt-Effing’s (1979) and Gursky’s (1984) xenolith rock collections from this locality. They are described and illustrated with full color images in dataset DS1. Despite marine erosion of rock exposures, xenolith samplings in different years still show similar lithologies at Playa Arbolito. As Figure S8 records, boring activity of pholadid bivalves in the intertidal zone actually contributes to active bioerosion of basement exposures, including pyroclastic xenoliths. The micropaleontological data show the notable first record of a Turonian planktic foraminiferal assemblage in marine pyroclastic rock from Nicoya Complex led by the index species Helvetoglobotruncana helvetica (Bolli) (Fig. S5). This find dates Cretaceous highly differentiated explosive arc volcanism in Costa Rica, similarly to that recorded by pyroclastic layers of the nearby Albian to Campanian Loma Chumico Formation, a sedimentary forearc basin succession (Calvo and Bolz, 1994; Calvo, 1998). The unique basalt-hosted xenolith assemblage including sedimentary tuffaceous lithologies, particularly highly differentiated biotite- and hornblende-bearing pyroclastic rocks, evidence bimodal volcanic activity linked to Cretaceous island arc volcanism on the western Caribbean Plate boundary. The variety of sedimentary xenolith lithologies also found in Mesozoic strata sections of Nicoya Peninsula and NE Gulf of Nicoya points out to xenolith formation caused by widespread and long-term (~140 to 70 Ma) intrusion of basalt throughout the Cretaceous deep-sea forearc basin succession. They also show that 90 Ma aged Tortugal komatiite lavas erupted coevally with explosive arc volcanism. These data contribute to understand the nature of igneous forearc basement rock exposed along the Pacific coast of southern Central America, and also provide a useful reference for future research in active forearc and arc settings.
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  • Bogaziçi University Smartphone Accelerometer Sensor Dataset
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  • Fintech India-customer predispositions-CEB-advocacy-Raw data CSV processed & ready for smartPLS
    The dataset contains raw data for perceived values for customer predispositions, CEBs, and customer advocacy collected from 380 FinTech app users in south India by administering a survey questionnaire. The dataset thus obtained was cleaned and processed for being used in smartPLS3. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) using partial least squares (PLS) method was later applied to this dataset in smartPLS3 to test the theoretical model, assess the structural model, and understand the direct and indirect effects of the variables.
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  • Supporting data for manuscript "Late Paleozoic southward migration of the Dananhu arc in the Eastern Tianshan (NW China)"
    The data are the supporting information (SI.) for the manuscript “Devonian to Carboniferous-Permian southward migration of the Dananhu juvenile arc in the Eastern Tianshan (NW China)”. They contain: 1. SI. Table 1 “Zircon U-Pb ages of granites in the Dananhu arc in eastern Tianshan orogen, NW China” is U-Pb dating results of granitic rocks at the Kezier (K), Tuwu (Y) and Kanguer area (N) in the Dananhu arc. They reveal that granitic magmas became younger southwards in the growing Dananhu arc from 401-335 Ma in the Kezier area, to 334-315 Ma in the Tuwu area, and finally to 279-254 Ma in the Kanguer accretionary belt. 2. SI. Table 2 “The major (wt%), trace element (ppm) data of granites in the Dananhu arc in the eastern Tianshan orogen, NW China.” is the geochemical results of granitic rocks at the Kezier (K), Tuwu (Y) and Kanguer area (N) in the Dananhu arc. These granitic rocks include I-type granites, A-type granites, and adakite-like granites. The I-type granites (401-270 Ma) were generated by partial melting of juvenile intermediate or mafic crust. The A2-type granites (K7, 356 Ma) were products of strong fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas in an extensional setting. The Late Permian adakite-like granite (N8, 254 Ma) was derived from a depleted subducted oceanic slab. 3. SI. Table 3 “Zircon Lu-Hf isotopic data of granites in the Dananhu arc in the eastern Tianshan orogen, NW China.” is the zircon Lu-Hf isotopic results of the Kezier (K), Tuwu (Y) and Kanguer area (N) in the Dananhu arc. These crust-derived granitic rocks have relatively high positive zircons εHf(t) (+7.7-+19.6) values and young model age, suggesting that the Dananhu arc was a juvenile accretionary arc. 4. SI. Table 4 “Summary of published zircons ages of mafic-ultramific and granitic intrusions in the Dananhu arc.” is the published zircons ages of Devonian to Permian granitic intrusions at the Kezier (K), Tuwu (Y) and Kanguer area (N), and the early Permian mafic-ultramific complex in the Dananhu arc. The granitic rocks are younging southward from Kezier area, to Tuwu area and Kanguer accretionary complex. The early Permian mafic-ultramific complex emplaced in the Dananhu arc. SI. Analytical methods contain the zircon U-Pb dating, zircon Lu-Hf analyses, major element and trace element experiments, and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses analytical methods.
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  • Mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between BAS and sport succes among elite athletes and physical education students
    The study included 156 athletes in two samples: (1) elite athlete (EA, n = 54) and physical education students (PE, n = 102). Participants completed an online survey with the Reinforced Sensitivity Questionnaire (RSQ), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), and Sport Success Scale (SSS).
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  • AITD CyTOF study normalized data set
    Files obtained from Helios mass cytometer for analysis of AITD patients.
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  • Acceptance, Self-Compassion, and Hope in Infertile Women
    SPSS and AMOS files and outputs
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  • Datasets of endodontic microorganisms killed at 265 and 280 nm wavelengths by ultraviolet C light emitting diodes
    Treatment of root canals with ultraviolet C (UVC) light-emitting diodes (LED) is a promising adjunct to current root canal disinfection procedures that are essential for preserving the health and the healing of periapical tissues. Here, we hypothesized that UVC LED treatment would kill microorganisms associated with endodontic infections and kill microorganisms in instrumented root canal models. Three different UVC LED units were constructed. One unit emitted 265 nm from a 12 mW LED, one unit emitted 265 nm from a 22.5 mW LED, and one unit emitted 280 nm from an 8 mW LED. Power levels emitted from the three units were measured without and with fiberoptic (FO) filaments using an energy meter (PM100D, Thorlabs, Inc., Newton, NJ USA) with a standard photodiode sensor (S120VC, 200-1100 nm, 50 mW; Thorlabs, Newton, NJ USA) for 30 seconds. The raw data from the energy meter readings for these 3 units is listed in Table 1. This includes the wavelength the meter used to record the data for each unit (Wavelength read at (nm)), the diameters of the hub opening or FO filament emitting the UV light (Diameter of hub opening or FO filament (mm)), the minimum power value recorded from the meter (Minimum value (µW)), the maximum power value recorded from the meter (Maximum value (µW)), the mean value recorded from the meter (Mean value (µW)), the standard deviation of the mean value recorded from the meter (Standard deviation (µW)), the number of meter readings (Number of readings (n)), and the time of recording (Time (sec)). The raw data from the antimicrobial activities of these 3 units on Candida albicans ATCC 64124, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA #7) treated in vitro on discs in laboratory assays is listed in Table 2. This includes the length of time each microorganism was treated (Group (seconds)), the UVC LED unit used to treat each microorganism (UVC LED treatment), the replication number (Replication), the microorganism treated (Microorganism), and the number of viable colony forming units (CFU) of microorganisms surviving UVC LED treatment (Viable CFU). The raw data from the antimicrobial activity of the 265 nm (22.5 mW) unit on E. faecalis ATCC 29212, C. albicans ATCC 64124, MRSA #7, or S. aureus ATCC 29213 in ex vivo models of root canals is listed in Table 3. This includes whether the group was a control or treatment (Group), if there was UVC LED treatment with the 265 nm (22.5 mW) unit (UVC LED treatment), the replication number (Replication), the microorganism treated (Microorganism), and the number of viable CFU of microorganisms surviving 265 nm (22.5 mW) unit treatment (Viable CFU).
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