International Journal for Parasitology

ISSN: 0020-7519
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Datasets associated with articles published in International Journal for Parasitology
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  • Of anthropogenic methane emissions 40% can be attributed to agriculture, a majority of which is from enteric fermentation in livestock. With international commitments to tackle drivers of climate change, there is a need to lower global methane emissions from livestock production. Gastrointestinal helminths (parasitic worms) are globally ubiquitous and represent one of the most pervasive challenges to the health and productivity of grazing livestock. These parasites influence a number of factors affecting methane emissions including feed efficiency, nutrient use, and production traits. However their effects on methane emissions are unknown. This is the first study that empirically demonstrates disease-driven increases in methane yield in livestock (grams of CH4 per kg of dry matter intake). We do this by measuring methane emissions (in respiration chambers), dry matter intake (DMI), and production parameters for parasitised and parasite-free lambs. This study shows that parasite infections in lambs can lead to a 33% increase in methane yield (g CH4/kg DMI). This knowledge will facilitate more accurate calculations of the true environmental costs of parasitism in livestock, and reveals the potential benefits of mitigating emission through controlling parasite burdens.
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  • Supplementary Figure S1 and Tables S1-4 for manuscript entitled "Patterns of parasite distribution in the hybrids of non-congeneric cyprinid fish species: is asymmetry in parasite infection the result of limited coadaptation? " by Krasnovyd V, Vetešník L, Gettová L, Civáňová K and Šimková A published in International Journal for Parasitology
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  • Results of BLASTn and BLASTx of putative Dientamoeba fragilis sequences against Trichomonas vaginalis
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  • Supporting Figures S1 and S2 of Renner, Lüdtke, Kaiser, Kienle, Schaefer, Segelbacher, Tschapka, Santiago-Alarcon (2016) "Forests of opportunities and mischief: disentangling the interactions between forests, parasites and immune responses" International Journal for Parasitology
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  • Supporting Data S1 to S4 of Renner, Lüdtke, Kaiser, Kienle, Schaefer, Segelbacher, Tschapka, Santiago-Alarcon (2016) "Forests of opportunities and mischief: disentangling the interactions between forests, parasites and immune responses" International Journal for Parasitology The data contains 4 data sets for the publication: (1) Supplementary Data S1 - Background and rationale on Structural Equations Modeling (SEM) approach and further SEMs tested (2) Supplementary Data S2 - R-code used for SEM (3) Supplementary Data S3 - input data for R-Codes (Data S2) part A with Sylvia atricapilla (blackcap) (4) Supplementary Data S4 - input data for R-Codes (Data S2) part B with Fringilla coelebs (chaffinch)
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  • Supporting Tables S1 to S6 of Renner, Lüdtke, Kaiser, Kienle, Schaefer, Segelbacher, Tschapka, Santiago-Alarcon (2016) "Forests of opportunities and mischief: disentangling the interactions between forests, parasites and immune responses" International Journal for Parasitology
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  • Raw image files for paper submitted to International Journal of Parasitology entitled: A new phylogeny and eDNA insight into paramyxids: an increasingly important but enigmatic clade of protistan parasites of marine invertebrates
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  • Revision of Hydatigera taeniaeformis species complex with a description of a new species (Lavikainen et al., IJP 2016): 1. Morphological data. A drawing (atypical segment). Morphological matrix. 2. DNA data. Nucleotide sequence alignments (18S rDNA; pold & pepck; mitochondrial protein-coding genes; cox1 complete haplotype data set).
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  • Experimental data for manuscript titled "The more the merrier – experimental evidence for density-dependent feeding facilitation in the bird-specialised tick Ixodes arboricola", published in International Journal of Parasitology. Experimental infestations of great tit (Parus major) nestlings with 1-5 adult tree-hole ticks (Ixodes arboricola). Data concern number of ticks placed on nestlings, tick attachment success after 1 h and 48 h, tick recovery rates, tick engorgement weight and tick scutum length, and nestling weight, tarsus length and developmental age at infestation and 48 h later. Additional factors include year, area and nest, and dates and times of infestation (time1) and inspection of nestlings (time2).
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  • Coinfections with parasitic helminths and microparasites are highly common in nature and can lead to complex within-host interactions between parasite species which can cause negative health outcomes for humans, and domestic and wild animals. Many of these negative health effects worsen with increasing parasite burdens. However, even though many studies have identified several key factors that determine worm burdens across various host systems, less is known about how the immune response interacts with these factors and what the consequences are for the outcome of within-host parasite interactions. We investigated two interacting gastrointestinal parasites of wild wood mice, Heligmosomoides polygyrus (nematode) and Eimeria spp. (coccidia), in order to investigate how host demographic factors, coinfection and the host´s immune response affected parasite burdens and infection probability, and to determine what factors predict parasite-specific and total antibody levels. We found that antibody levels were the only factors that significantly influenced variation in both H. polygyrus burden and infection probability, and Eimeria spp. infection probability. Total faecal IgA was negatively associated with H. polygyrus burden and Eimeria spp. infection, whereas H. polygyrus-specific IgG1 was positively associated with H. polygyrus infection. We further found that the presence of Eimeria spp. had a negative effect on both faecal IgA and H. polygyrus-specific IgG1. Our results show that even in the context of natural demographic and immunological variation amongst individuals, we were able to decipher a role for the host humoral immune response in shaping the within-host interaction between H. polygyrus and Eimeria spp.,mouse_trapping_dataThis file contains all the data collected from trapped mice and was used in the analysisSession2_Completeparasites.csv,
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